Title IX

Pregnant and Parenting Students

Title IX Requirements Regarding Pregnant and Parenting Students from the U.S. Department of Education:

Title IX prohibits discrimination against a student based on pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery from any of these conditions. The Title IX regulations also prohibits a school from applying any rule related to a student’s parental, family, or marital status that treats students differently based on their sex.

Among other things, Title IX requires a school to excuse a student’s absences due to pregnancy or related conditions, including recovery from childbirth, for as long as the student’s doctor deems the absences to be medically necessary. Title IX also prohibits harassment of students based on sex, including harassment because of pregnancy or related conditions. Harassing conduct can take many forms, including verbal acts and name-calling, graphic and written statements, and other conduct that may be humiliating or physically threatening or harmful. Particular actions that could constitute prohibited harassment include making sexual comments or jokes about a student’s pregnancy, calling a pregnant student sexually charged names, spreading rumors about her sexual activity, and making sexual propositions or gestures. The University will take prompt and appropriate steps reasonably calculated to end pregnancy related harassment, prevent its recurrence, and eliminate any hostile environment created by the harassment.

Helpful Tips for Pregnant and Parenting Students:

  • Ask the University for help—meet with the Title IX Coordinator regarding what the University can do to support you in continuing your education.
  • Keep notes about your pregnancy-related absences, any instances of harassment, and immediately report problems to your school’s Title IX Coordinator.
  • If you feel you have been discriminated against you because you are pregnant or parenting you may file a complaint using the University's Title IX process, with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR) or in court.